Gibson TB-2 #9598-29

#9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 front    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 back    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 peghead    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 lower frets    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 middle frets    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 upper frets    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 peghead back

#9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 pot    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 pot    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 pot    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 pot detail    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 tension hoop repair    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 flange repair    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 flange damage

#9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 inside pot    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 flange and neck heel    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 Grover tuner    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 resonator    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 factory order numbers in resonator    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 large factory order number in resonator    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 small factory order number in resonator

#9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 The Gibson decal in rim    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 factory order number in rim    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 resonator screws    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 #511 case open    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 in #511 case    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 case candy    #9598-29 Gibson banjo TB-2 #511 case closed

Gibson's 1930 catalog described the TB-2, the highest-priced non-Mastertone tenor banjo offered by the company at the time, as "a real 'pal' for the banjo lover", providing "a snappy, brilliant tone, powerful volume, reliable trueness and a world of 'good looks'".  The style 2 of the 1930s was, like style 11, a lower-priced model which dressed itself up through the use of a pearloid fingerboard and peghead overlay with stenciled designs.  Unlike style 11, however, style 2 limited its pearloid veneers to the neck; the resonator was walnut with single white binding on both edges.  The hardware was nickel-plated.

#9598-29 (see Gibson banjo serial numbers vs. factory order numbers) dates to 1930 and shows evidence of a previous owner struggling with the problems sometimes caused by the pot metal tension hoops and flanges of the period.  As the flange pulled up due to the tension of the bracket hooks, the resonator screws became difficult to manipulate and so nuts were added to lift them clear of the flange; at some point the tension hoop and flange were both cracked and repairs were attempted.  An aftermarket armrest has also been added.  The walnut veneer on style 2 resonators varied from quite plain to highly figured; the veneer on this example is particularly attractive.  The banjo remains in its original #511 case by Geib and Schaefer.
 


Home